Anonymous hacker at work

Protect your information

Scamming people has been around for ages and as long as people continue to fall for them, people will continue to set them into motion. New scams and new mediums with which to create them are changing and growing constantly. The new thing? Computers and interactive scams. As long as people use computers, criminals will continue to use them in their scamming efforts.

Some examples of common scams include:

  • The Nigerian Prince check scam
  • Winning a fake lottery or prize
  • Travel scams
  • Disaster relief scams
  • Phishing

We know people are falling for these because studies show a good percentage of people are willing to give out personal information voluntarily to people they may or may not know. This can be interpreted as a majority of the population is not careful enough with their information. It’s scary to find the numbers are sometimes in favor of the criminals.

Avoid being the victim of a scam

Education is key when it comes to scams. You should stay on top of current techniques scammers are using so you know what to look for in a scam.

How do you know if it’s legit or fraudulent?

To protect yourself, your company, and your customers from these cyber attacks you need to be up to date with current scamming trends and also know some best practices to follow in case you are suspicious of something.

Here are a list of cyber safety tips and best practices to follow to help minimize your chances of falling victim to a scam:

  1. Pop-ups
  • Make sure your browser has a pop-up blocker turned on.
  • Be suspicious of any pop-ups.
  1. Spelling errors
  2. Email
  • Be cautious of all links and attachments.
  • If you are not expecting or not familiar with an email address, be cautious.
  • Be cautious the email body is vague.
  • If you are possibly familiar with sender but were not expecting the email, reach out to the person to see if they did in fact try to email you.
  1. Familiarize yourself with popular scams or social engineering tactics
  • There are many great news websites with articles on current scams.
  • Example: JohnD@marrillych.com (Notice "Merrill Lynch" is spelled incorrectly?)
  1. If something says, “time sensitive” and you’re not familiar with the contents, do not feel the pressure to be rushed.

It’s not a bad thing to be suspicious! If something seems suspicious, consult us here at TimbukTech or do some further research to determine what the best course of action should be. Remember that like a fence or a firewall, you are the first line of defense to your money and information.

What is the best way to defend yourself against cybercrimes?

The best advice for defending against these scams is to be aware. Be aware that people are trying to scam you and be aware that the resources exist to help you spot these scams. If you follow these cyber safety tips, stay vigilant, and stay updated – You should feel more confident that you’re protecting your money and your information.


Busy man working with computer while talking on phone

Your IT guy won’t beat an MSP

Does your company work with a Managed Services Provider (MSP) like TimbukTech or are you relying on a “tech guy” in-house? We’re willing to bet that you’re relying heavily on a “tech guy” and hoping you don’t run into any difficulties. There are some drawbacks to that logic. Let’s take a look.

IT is the secondary role of your employee

Often, we find that your employee was not hired to be the IT guy, but in fact he’s the receptionist first and IT guy second. His core duties are scheduling, taking and making phone calls, routing email, directing visitors around, and much more. On top of these primary duties, your whole company is calling on this employee to fix their tech issues. At this point, he’s doing two jobs. It’s highly likely that this employee is not doing either job to his fullest ability as he can’t focus on one at a time.

Employee burnout

When one person is handling two jobs at the same time, the effort can really bog them down. He was asked to be a tech person because he knows a few things about computers and now that everyone’s aware of that, they’ll be calling upon him frequently. Anyone who has taken on extra duties beyond their core role knows that it is easy to get burnt out fairly quickly.

So now we ask, what if that employee quits? What happens when things turn ugly late at night? Is it up to this overworked employee to get up and come in to handle the situation? If he can’t come in until the next day, what does this mean for the company? Downtime can be costly.

Employee limitations

“The tech guy” can come with many limitations. Out of 40 hours in the workweek, how many are to be spent on their primary occupation and how many are to be spent on tech?

Another limitation might be training. It’s likely that this person has never read a page of a Network+ book, taken the MCSE test, or had any other IT training. Yet your company has him poking around in the network. What happens when he makes a mistake that brings the network down? Now you’re hiring a 3rd party anyway to come in and fix what’s broken. That can be expensive … often over $120 an hour, plus loss of business!

MSPs can help

When we come across a client that uses a “tech guy” in-house, we ask the following questions to assess lost revenue.

  • When was the last time your server was down?
  • How long did it take to bring it back up?
  • Were you able to conduct business without the server?
  • Did your tech person know how to fix the IT issue?
  • Did you need to call in a 3rd party to fix the IT issue?
  • How many times has the server or network gone down? Is this a fairly common occurrence?

The underlying cost of downtime could equate to a lot more than a monthly agreement with TimbukTech as your MSP. We’re here to help you understand the implications of not having a solid IT solution. Let’s explore your business’ options. Give us a call at 309-444-7263 and we’ll go through your specific needs and weigh your options.